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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
of east oakland, one of the city's toughest areas it happened in the span of just three hours. crime scene technicians were still gathering evidence this afternoon across the street from abdellaoui. >> we hear things happening in oakland but usually on international avenue or other places. >> reporter: it's not the only city to hire this man to help fight crime. brad bradley is the former police chief that brought down crime in new york and los angeles. >> you can't say that's a bad choice. let's hope he's a good fit. >> reporter: burress is a long time outspoken critic of the oakland police department. >> surprising that the city has retained bill bratton at this stage in light of the fact that we're in the process of seeking to obtain a compliance director that would have substantial responsibilities. >> reporter: credentials aside, burress doesn't think one person will cut crime in oakland but at a media conference yesterday, police chief howard jordan seemed willing to give it a try. >> i take ownership adds t he -- ownership as the chief of police that this crime is happening on my wa
of over and hour, 160-minute delays averaging in the city of philadelphia, and philly international airport. the rain moving on in. in new york city not expecting to see too much snowfall, maybe a coating, an inch or two into the afternoon hours and the evening. inland, the taoeupb yore portions of the northeast easily over a foot of snow. some place expect thing 18 inches. severe weather risk across parts of the indianas and the char line as. >> reporter: i just made it through laguardia last notice and that weather forecast is exactly why i came back. thank you. >> reporter: the united states is less than a week away from going over the so-called fiscal cliff. they say if president obama and congress don't make a deal we will almost certainly see a recession. do you buy that, steven? >> the congressional budget office is a nonpartisan group that does this and says we will in fact have an immediate rescission. they say that we come out of a short, sharp recession stronger than we would be if we didn't go into that recession in the first place. we stop borrowing money from the futur
rebel operations in the eastern city of aszohr. meanwhile, russia's top diplomat and international envoy to syria met in moscow and they are calling for a syrian-led political transition. they warn the conflict is becoming more militarized and sectarian. >> the conflict is not only more and more militarized, it is also more and more sectarian. and if we are not careful, if the syrians themselves are not careful, it will be a mainly sectarian conflict with really dire consequences for the people of syria. >> the meeting appears to signal a shift in position by russia. so far moscow has opposed efforts by the u.n. security council to oust syrian president who has been a longtime ally. >>> meanwhile, a member of russia's parliament is trying to reverse part of a controversial law banning all adoptions by americans. the state-run news agency says the lawmaker is submitting an amendment that would allow americans to adopt children with disabilities. but the u.s. is hoping for a total reversal and so are hundreds of americans waiting to adopt russian orphans. lisa silvester has more. >> report
they ate lunch at a restaurant yesterday. two dozen teens and young adults from the international ministry group were starting a five day trip. the group says it is devastated. >>> city college of fran is facing a financial -- san francisco is fating a financial hit. they must enroll 34,000 full- time students to maintain its funding level from the state but the school expects to fall a few thousand students short for the second year in a row. it was on probation because of a shortage of students during the previous school year. >>> arizona's tough on immigration sheriff is defending his controversial stance and one of america's most immigrant friendly cities. >> drag queens calling themselves the sisters of perpetual indulgence, invaded a dinner party. earlier he had received letters from 8th graders questioning him about his views but the school canceled that meeting. >> they accused me of running concentration camps. they called me a racist. i could go on and on. immaterialed to emit with the kids and tell them the truth. >> the school district media rep says she was too busy to explain
is live for us in charlotte, north carolina. john? >> only 1800 lodges across the country. child city and school for needy children attached to moose international headquarters. officials told me late this afternoon they have not been able to get in touch. nor have we. we tried all day. he is out of the country apparently on a cruise with his wife celebrating their 50th wedding anniversary in his absence moose international provided me with this statement this afternoon saying quote the moose fraternity is shocked by this allegation as this is not the k. the moose organization is not a party to this lawsuit consistent with board lawsuit. mr. airey will not be in contact with residential students at moose heart until further notice. the man who brought this suit dr. jason peck told me in an exclusive interview that he was befriended by airey at the age of 11 or 12 when they lived in columbus, ohio. that he would take him to many moose related events some of them overnight trips that his mother actually gave the blessing for it was on one of those overnight trips in ohio that peck told
or three-day massacre of the city or a chemical -- use of chemical weapon s that would galvanize an international response and compel the international community to respond. so it's been more this piece-by-piece and has to do with the various limitations on the syrian army and the trust tt worthy elements of the syrian army. but i would blame the government most of all for that initial reaction. >> thank you. yes. >> yes, personally don't think we should have gone the middle east in a war for any reason, but bush had to have his war. the russians failed, the british failed. don't you think we started all these clans and these factions -- haven't we stirred them up by starting these things we did? can you comment on that? >> comment on how we can -- >> well, not on -- well, you kind of tried to say what we could do, but didn't we serve all this stuff up anyway going into iraq? >> oh, yes, yes. >> the clans, the factions. if the british couldn't do it and the -- what made us think we could do anything? >> you know, it's -- everyone thinks they can do it better. everyone thinks they
at capturing the lights of our cities at night. that brings the program to a close. tune in tomorrow when i sit down with the head of the imf, christine lagarde. thanks for watching. good night. >> makes sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding of this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and help provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los angeles. guess what, neighbour? today we're going to visit... mr. mcfeely's post office! and then we're going to... baker aker's bakery! i'm so excited to spend the day with you. and i'll be right back. is made possible in part by... the richard king mellon foundation. dedicated for over sixty years to south western pennsylvania's quality of life, and competitive future. a
. the city does -- has spent nearly $1 million already this year on police consultants. they hope to help the backlog of internal affairs investigations. william bratton and his security consultant group is scheduled to start in oakland next month. >> is this a one-year deal? it's a contract that they have signed with bratton
the warplanes. what we hear again and again when rebels capture a city or liberate a city and then the airplanes come in and warplanes start shelling and drive them out of those areas. >> we know the international envoy for syria he was in russia and today he's in egypt. what specifically is he trying to accomplish? >> well, he's in egypt today to report back to the arab league and to the secretary-general of the arab league and his findings from his diplomatic trips these past few days. he was in syria meeting with other figures and then brahimi went to moscow where he met with the foreign minister. the foreign minister of russia as well as brahimi urged all sides to come to the table but the fighting still rages on in syria. now, today, we heard just in the last hour from brahimi. he actually said in cairo that the situation is so bad in syria that now we have close to 50,000 people killed there in the nearly two years of war. by next year, up to 100,000. there is an opportunity of parties to come together, but not going to last forever and the situation there is getting more and more dire eve
are claiming they attacked several rebel operations in the eastern city. meantime, russia's top diplomat and international envoy to syria met in mosquito. they're calling for a -- in moscow. they're calling for a syrian-elderly transition and warning the conflict is becoming more medicilitarized and sectar. >> the conflict is not only more and more militarized, it is also more and more sectarian. and if we are not careful, if the syrians themselves are not careful, it will be a mainly sectarian conflict with really dire consequences for the people of syria. >> moscow has opposed efforts by the u.n. security council to oust the syrian president, a long-time ally. >>> one of the effects as the fiscal cliff gets closer. the hardline tea party is having a harder time holding the line on an absolute pledge not to raise taxes. copd makes it hard to breathe, but with advair, i'm breathing better. so now i can be in the scene. advair is clinically proven to help significantly improve lung function. unlike most copd medications, advair contains both an anti-inflammatory and a long-acting bronchod
wears prada." that would be very interesting. >> she knows both cities very well. >> and she has quite a reputation for being a tough negotiator. >> thank you. >>> tony blair is standing by to join us live. we're going to talk about the international suspicions that syria's regime may be preparing to use chemical weapons against its own people. two years ago, the people of bp made a commitment to the gulf. bp has paid over twenty-three billion dollars to help those affected and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open, and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. and bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. he opened up jake's very private world. at first, jake's family thought they saved ziggy, but his connection with jake has been a lifesaver. for a love this strong, his family only feeds him iams. compared to other leading brands, it has 50% more animal protein... ...to help keep ziggy's
of a glorious past. and some parts of the city bustle with holiday energy. but not far away: closed-up storefronts. and, further below the surface, this: a health clinic set up by the greek branch of the international aid group, doctors of the world to serve the country's newly poor. dr. nikitis kanakis is its director. >> brown: kanakis group, in fact, had to cut back some of its work in africa because of the needs at home. here in perama, unemployment tops 50% as the shrinking economy has crippled much of the local shipping industry. at the same time, the deeply indebted greek government has made dramatic budget cuts, including to health benefits. the combination has left many here without access to private or public care. and that's meant a stunning rise in disease and mortality rates. >> brown: economists, of course, speak of a different kind of necessary medicine: the kind a deeply indebted nation must take. the price for living and consuming well beyond its means for far too long. >> the medicine is necessary. it was, though, delivered very abruptly. >> brown: as a government
be the last warning washington gets. cnn's senior international correspondent arwa damon is inside syria right now where the fighting rages on. >> reporter: aleppo's old city has not seen such devastation since occupied by the mongol invaders eight centuries ago. this mosque for example dates back to 1315. this is syria's rich cultural heritage. and now everywhere we look it's been scarred by war. once bustling winding streets now a maze of ever-shifting front lines. overhead, the thundering of fighter jets. a small han lodging for caravans lies in ruins. for more than three millennia aleppo has been a cross roads for traders. we hurried through the courtyard of a traditional home. sheets are strung across streets to block snipers' line of sight. those who dare venture quickly across. a unit of fighters records people's names and license plates. only those who have shops here are allowed through. abu bashir says they're trying to clamp down on robberies. he shows us the list. the highlighted names have cleared out all their possessions. in one market a shop recently hit by army fire still smol
key intelligence to the rebels and the international community as well. >> soon we'll hit the two-year mark for what has been happening in syria and over the past several months, city after city, rebels are making huge gains, more high level defections, the latest from this police chief. at what point is this civil war won? >> reporter: it is a good question. this has been a war of attrition. you said, yes, that's right. it has been nearly two years. over 40,000 people killed, seems to get worse day after day, and all in happening at a time when in syria now you have the joint u.n. arab league envoy trying to negotiate some sort of peaceful settlement to the crisis there. it just hasn't happened. it just seems to get worse. you have the rebels saying they're taking one of the key bases in the north of the country on a highway that connects aleppo to damascus and yet still they cannot claim that they have won. it seems that the rebels are gaining momentum. we hear this more from the opposition activist but the government maintains they're ridding the territories across syria of the
countries and the internally displaced persons to hold the region's. at the same time, as logistically challenging as it may be, holding elections in the major cities and in the northern regions would be this strong guest impossible of mali's sovereignty or territory and steps of rebuilding a democracy. the transition government is government plans and actions to the public and the crisis of legitimacy. the international community needs to harmonize its approach toward the pursuit of the polls that could lead to the legitimately elected government and military actions to detect the north. the contradictory public that take the military option off the table in the short and medium-term may only serve to emboldened the extra hauling them time to reinforce their presence. such also exacerbate fear there may be a conspiracy to breakout and to the civilian space rule out the hand of the pro-democracy forces within the country and for the work that is deeply invested in the space rule. many malians were proud of the country's democracy to consolidating the need by strengthening institutions
of financial support they got from the opposition or international community. would that make the situation more difficult? despite that, all of these liberated areas, they became very excited. they start thinking about some civilian projects. in one city, as example, six elementary and secondary schools are out of service. no one is interested to send his kids to the school. when i left the city -- next week, a fighter jet hits one of the schools. this is why none of the people are interested to send their kids to the school. they are still easy targets. even the hospitals are being targeted by the regime. we cannot call these as mainly liberated areas, because they are still targeted by the air force of the assad regime. that reflects the difficulties between the different groups of the three syrian army. we have borders with iraq and turkey under the control of the free syrian army. because of the absence of having a central command of the free syrian army, each border is controlled by a different group. there is a lack of authority which can extend its power. there is high risk for any
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)